On Monday the 11th of April, the Dartmoor Preservation Association were treated to an excellent walk on Mardon Down led by Andy Crabb, archaeologist with the Dartmoor National Park Authority. For such a comparatively small area the Down abounds with a vast amount of archaeology including the largest stone circle on Dartmoor as well as hut circles, cairns, kists and reaves. The walkers were also surprised to find out the part that Mardon Moor played in the second world war. Camped on the moor were a regiment of American engineers [a black regiment] who practised laying railway track along a purpose built gully and one of the walkers, Derek Collins, can recall in 1944 seeing the engineers building Bailey Bridges across the gully, all these activities were in preparation for the D-Day landings and some care should be taken when walking as the moor still has a considerable amount of mortar pits, slit trenches and fox holes dug by the soldiers. The walk was of particular interest because the DPA Conservation Team had recently spent several days clearing the scrub from around the various remains. Many thanks to Andy for a most informative, and in some cases nostalgic, guided walk.
DPA members with Andy Crabb (DNPA) on Mardon Down

DPA members with Andy Crabb (DNPA) on Mardon Down