What can I say? The DPA volunteers sallied out again on Thursday 9th October into a very grey day, meeting at the main Clearbrook car park beside Drake’s Plymouth Leat. After the last workday, which involved staff from Exeter University (26 Sept. 2014), we returned to the area where we finished working on 6th March prior to the nesting season. On realising that this really finished where the leat met the golf course, we returned to the start of that section where the first 60 metres or so had never been cleared of scrub.

Shortly after work had started, looking towards the tunnel.

Shortly after work had started, looking towards the tunnel.

The photograph above shows the area where we started, close to the tunnel entrance.

DPA volunteers at work, near the tunnel.

DPA volunteers at work, near the tunnel.

Still working near the tunnel …..

Getting in close.

Getting in close.

And again …….

Clearing the tunnel entrance.

Clearing the tunnel entrance.

A machinist is right at the entrance of the tunnel …..

The tunnel entrance.

The tunnel entrance.

The tunnel entrance is now visible …..

Inside the tunnel.

Inside the tunnel.

Looking inside the tunnel – this is actually the exit, at the Clearbrook end – the entrance is at the Yelverton end, 200 metres distant.  I walked through the tunnel on  3rd August 2011.

Overview of the tunnel entrance.

Overview of the tunnel entrance.

This is the site where the Devonport Leat project publicity photograph was taken in March 2011.  It was the other end of the tunnel where the DPA efforts began on 2nd September 2011.

Clearing the clapper bridge.

Clearing the clapper bridge.

There is a clapper bridge along this section that was well and truly hidden. The volunteers involved today were Bill Radcliffe, Chris Francis, Derek Collins (Tool Master), Hilary Luce (Cake Queen, with delicious fruit cake), John Watson, Keith Ryan, Nigel Peace, Rachel Watson, Stephen Barrow, Sylvia Hamilton and Val Barns, making a total of 12.

The "holey" stone.

The “holey” stone, lining the side wall of the leat.

The photograph above shows a stone lining the leat that is seven paces before the clapper bridge. It looks a s if it may have been “robbed” from the nearby Tyrwhitt’s Tramway although we have not measured the railway granite setts for comparison.

Clearing scrub, in heavy rain.

Clearing scrub, in heavy rain.

This photograph was taken near the end of work in heavy rain – clearly I had not communed enough with the weather gods!

The clapper bridge.

The clapper bridge.

A final view of the well-cleared clapper bridge. This point is marked on the Google Aerial view of the project area, HERE.

To see larger images, click on the photographs, a second click enlarges them further – use the arrow keys to move around a scene.