No, it is not All Fools Day. Following on from my wanderings on 21st December 2012, where the flowing of both Plymouth and Devonport Leats was described, I returned to Roborough Common on Sunday 23rd and discovered a third flowing leat. I learned later this was Clearbrook Leat.

As suggested in the previous blog entry, water, particularly from the old WW2 aerodrome (RAF Harrowbeer), is drained into Devonport Leat at Yelverton. It flows for about 200 metres and is then diverted into Plymouth Leat. This leat was seen flowing well for some distance past the car park beside the leat at Clearbrook but when the far end of the leat was looked at, it was dry. Therefore, the water must be going somewhere.

The breach in Plymouth Leat.

The breach in Plymouth Leat.

The photograph above shows the breach in the leat at SX 52260 64914. Just out of sight to the left of the photograph is a sizeable dam in the leat that prevents water from travelling any further in a westerly direction. The movie below starts looking along the leat back towards Clearbrook, then it pans past the breach to look in a westerly direction (towards Roborough / Plymouth) and then back again to look at the outflow from the breach.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/_pFhnNhM2LQ&rel=0]

This is my first attempt at embedding a movie, via YouTube, so I hope it works!

Click the play icon in the centre of images to see the movie.

For the ultimate experience of “being there”, click the four-cornered icon at the far right in the black bar below the image to make “full screen”. Remember to press the Esc button (top left on the keyboard) afterwards to return to normal viewing. 

From the breach, the water tumbles down the hill, as shown in the following photograph ….

Water from Plymouth Leat running down the hill from the breach.

Water from Plymouth Leat running down the hill from the breach.

The water was running down the hillside quite quickly and was reminiscent of Devonport Leat where it runs down the side of Raddick Hill. The water continues down the hill and crosses under the road to Goodameavy. The next movie (below) shows the water from Plymouth Leat running down the hill.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/hEdBNK9qcFM&rel=0]

The water runs downhill and passes under the road ….. the road can be seen briefly in the background in this movie from 21 to 27 seconds of play.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/GyaISt1m3xU&rel=0]

Once the water has crossed the road, it runs almost level and is “leated” away, contouring around the hill.

Clearbrook Leat, showing the first breach.

Clearbrook Leat, showing the first breach.

There is a breach in Clearbrook Leat at SX 52454 64849. The photograph shows a well-constructed leat, although there are currently two breaches in it. It is not presently known if these are intentional. The leat runs towards Clearbrook, hence its name locally.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/zI3vnaD99T0&rel=0]

The movie above is an animated view of the previous photograph. It shows Clearbrook Leat flowing in from the right and out towards the left. There is a breach approximately in front of the camera where the water runs away down the hill. Click the play icon in the centre of the image to see the movie.

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Clearbrook Leat, showing the second breach.

The second breach is at SX 52509 64912. The photograph above shows the leat flowing  in from the right and outflow from this breach flowing away from the camera towards the left of the photograph. The leat continues on out of view to the left. It is difficult to take a good, illustrative photograph because the scrub gets in the way – perhaps this is another leat for the DPA Conservation Team to attend to?

The leat runs for a short distance further but then peters out. The leat construction seems to continue around the hill but investigating this is for another day, another web log entry?

The final photograph was taken from the end of the flowing water …..

Looking down into the valley at the River Meavy.

Looking down into the valley at the River Meavy.

The water from the breaches represents the vast bulk of the flow which runs downhill to the River Meavy. The water that flows past the second breach does not travel much further and is almost at a standstill. It would be interesting to follow the now-dry leat further to see where it goes: similarly with the end path of the water from the breaches.

Further photographs and movies can be seen on a separate web page, HERE.