Despite the wet, conservation work has gone ahead throughout the winter.   Of six planned days in February, four took place.

At High House Waste at the beginning of the month we continued clearing re-growth of gorse on some of the old farmstead walls and banks as well as strimming for a new track.

Two days’ work on the Plymouth (Drake’s) Leat on Roborough Down cleared re-growth of gorse along about 1km, a pretty impressive result.  On the second day we were joined by 10 occupational therapy students and two lecturers from Plymouth University.

 

Plymouth Uni students on the leat, 26 Feb 2020

Plymouth Uni students on the leat, 26 Feb 2020

 

For our fourth February workday we returned to Moortown Bottom, near Throwleigh on the east of the moor.   We joined the local conservation group – Sticklepath and Okehampton Conservation (StOC) –a total of 29 people.   Gorse was again the target, but this time it was old and tall, so instead of strimmers, it was loppers, bowsaws and bonfires.

 

Moortown Bottom - a lot of gorse to burn, 21 Feb 2020

Moortown Bottom – a lot of gorse to burn, 21 Feb 2020

 

Moortown Bottom lunch break, 21 Feb 2020

Moortown Bottom lunch break, 21 Feb 2020

 

With three more days due in March, it will have been a very successful winter season.  After mid-March volunteers take a break (so ground nesting birds aren’t disturbed) until early summer when there will be some surveying, then from the end of June it will be back to bracken bashing.